This site uses cookies to improve your browsing experience. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies.  Find out more here.
YES

Five haunted tourist attractions in Europe

Five haunted tourist attractions in Europe Halloween is supposed to be the annual time when ghosts and ghouls rise from the dead and taunt the living. It’s a spooky night, but at least it only comes to our doors once a year. Other places in Europe aren’t so lucky – with its bloody history and turbulent times there are plenty of locations for ghost-hunters to catch a glimpse of the afterlifers throughout the year.

From ghoulish green ladies to wails of Pagan priests, the horror stories of Europe will have you quaking in your shoes. Even more fearfully, many of these haunted locations now serve as tourist attractions that sees visitors enjoy the grounds by day but get spooked by night. Here are five places the Flexicover team suggest you check out on your travels – if you dare!

Glin Castle, Co Limerick, Ireland

Glin Castle, Co Limerick, Ireland

Today, Glin Castle is a four-star hotel, but there are three uninvited guests. The poltergeist, which lives on the third floor, was discovered in the 1960s. Manager Bob Doff explains: "The housekeeper and cook were upstairs in one of the rooms when they heard clattering from the landing. When they opened the door, the noise stopped, but this strange phenomenon continued." The poltergeist only appears to women but Henry, a builder from the 1820s who fell from scaffolding during the castle's renovation, is a more frequent visitor. He appears on the stairs, often with his ropes, and is so fully-formed that visitors often think he's real. The third ghost, believed to be the 20th Earl Of Glin, appears in the smoking room sitting in an armchair.
The Museum of the History of Tenerife, Canary Islands

The Museum of the History of Tenerife, Canary Islands

The ghostly spectre of Catalina Lercaro doesn’t stop people from visiting Tenerife’s major history museum. Years before the building’s present use, it was the mansion of the Lercaro family, important Genoese merchants. In the 16th century, a young Catalina was forced by her family to marry an older, wealthier man. She was so forcefully against the marriage that on her wedding day she threw herself into a pit in the courtyard and killed herself. Legend has it that her body was buried inside the mansion, which may explain why many visitors report the ghostly figure of Catalina Lercaro walking through the hallways.
The Château de Brissac, France

The Château de Brissac, France

Not far from Nantes, the Château de Brissac is a stunning French castle that attracts plenty of visitors with its tours and accommodation. But behind its beauty is a deadly tale – in the 15th century, a double murder took place, and one of the victims still roams the house, often seen in the chapel. This ghost is named ‘la Dame Verte’ or the Green Lady, as she’s always seen wearing a green dress. Those who’ve seen her up close report the most terrifying aspect about her: she has a corpse-like face, with gaping holes for her eyes and nose. She also haunts the castle with her wails: early in the morning, her moans carry through the castle halls.
Akershus Fortress, Oslo, Norway

Akershus Fortress, Oslo, Norway

It’s a wonder that the medieval castle of Akershus Fortress is a popular tourist attraction and a venue for concerts and events, given it’s believed to be the most haunted place in Norway. First built in 1300, it became used as a prison in the late 18th and 19th centuries, where many prisoners died in bad conditions and ill treatment. Its gruesome use didn’t end there – under Nazi occupation in the Second World War, it was used as a place of execution. It’s no wonder that paranormal activity is high. Particularly chilling is the belief that Malcanisen, a hound of hell, is now said to guard the gates of the castle. Those who encounter the demon dog can expect to suffer a horrible death within the following three months.
Berlin Zitadelle, Germany

Berlin Zitadelle, Germany

The citadel in Berlin’s Spandau area is now the location of museums, exhibitions and galleries, but its dark past is reflected in the spooky goings-on that remain alongside its day use. The structure was built in 1557. During its time as a palace keep, once the 15th century ruler Joachim II died, his son locked up his lover, Anna Sydow, within the castle. She died there, and now visitors might spot a ghostly apparition of her dressed in white, which is how she’s become known as the Weiße Frau or ‘the White Lady’.
Well if those stories haven’t put you off from visiting one of these spooky places then it’s good to know that Flexicover Travel Insurance is committed to providing you with the highest level of protection to ensure you are safe and secure 24 hours a day when away.


We are proud to work with